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BlusterOne: The Birth of a PNB Nation, Spirituality and Graffiti

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BlusterOne

Part 1

Part 2

 

This episode is brought to you by Peralta Project. Well not officially, I didn’t actually speak to Tony and his team but I’ve love what they’re doing over there. I’m a fan of Tony’s art and of course I love the clothing. Plus he’s been a guest on the show, click here.

BlusterOne

Photography by Laurie Markiewicz

When Tony opened up his shop Taller Peralta, he connected with today’s guest to paint the front gate. Today’s guest is James K. Alicea aka BlusterOne. This is going to be a two part episode. In this episode, Bluster and I talk about growing up in the Lower East Side, his early graffiti days, Rakim lyrics, religion, spirituality, the Five Percent Nation and his introduction to Islam.

Enjoy.

Keep Up with BlusterOne

  1. Official Website
  2. Instagram
  3. 1xRUN

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BlusterOne

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Part 2 Show Notes

  1. Islam
  2. Quran
  3. Hadith
  4. Hafiz
  5. Islamic Cultural Center of New York
  6. Charlie Hebdo shooting
  7. How are you trying to grow as a human being?
  8. Christianity
  9. Buddhism
  10. Dogma
  11. The globe is bigger than the books
  12. Nuyorican
  13. Latin communities that are Muslim
  14. Moors
  15. History of Spain
  16. Mecca
  17. Make it to Mecca
  18. Malcolm X Explains His Pilgrimage to Mecca 1964
  19. PNB Nation Part 1 from The Limited Edition Magazine
  20. PNB Nation VIBE Article
  21. The 50 Greatest Streetwear T-Shirts of All Time by Jeff Staples in Complex Nov. 19, 2013 (Just a note tying this all together- Jeff was on the New York Said Podcast too- here’s his episode: Jeff Staple talks Streetwear Ambassador, 20 Years of Staple Design and Reed Space
  22. PNB Logo
  23. Post no bills
  24. Cooper Union
  25. Hardcore into Stamps
  26. Casey Rubber Stamps
  27. Afro-Latin Americans
  28. Afro-Puerto Ricans
  29. Shout out to Chessa
  30. Graffiti Culture
  31. Racking- stealing supplies for graffiti writing
  32. Sullivan County Community College
  33. Writer
  34. Behold the Pale Horse (book) by milton william cooper
  35. The Spook Who Sat By the Door YouTube Full Film
  36. SS3Tony
  37. Kahlil “Zulu” Williams Twitter @sergefc
  38. Yuri Kochiyama (political activist)
  39. Roger “Brue” Mchayle Twitter @Brueroc
  40. Issac “West” Rubinstein
  41. Sung Choi Twitter @sungchoi_
  42. Post No Bills
  43. Free Stylin‘: How Hip Hop Changed the Fashion Industry: How Hip Hop Changed …By elenaromero
  44. Futura (artist)
  45. 48 Laws of Power by robert greene (book)
  46. Hello my name is…
  47. Sean John
  48. FUBU
  49. Rocawear
  50. Phat Farm
  51. Phillies Blunt Street Wear
  52. The 50 Greatest Pop Culture References In Streetwear by Complex
  53. School of Hard Knocks (visual)
  54. School of Hard Knocks Founder
  55. 555 Soul
  56. Union
  57. FUCT
  58. Stussy
  59. Eric Brunetti Book FUCT
  60. West Coast Streetwear
  61. GAT-Gypsies and Thieves streetwear brand
  62. Freshjive Streetwear brand
  63. Tribal Streetwear
  64. D12 Logo for Anger Management Tour
  65. Keds
  66. RockRubber45s Original Poster Art was done by BlusterOne
  67. What’s Good with Stretch & Bobbito Podcast
  68. ‘Rock Rubber 45s’ Q&A with Bobbito Garcia a.k.a. Kool Bob Love New York Said Episode
  69. Respect for the culture
  70. WBAI FM Third World Cypher Radio Show with BlusterOne and Brue
  71. Shabba Ranks – Wicked in a bed – YouTube
  72. Duffed
  73. Lose with the mouth
  74. Quality of Life
  75. We don’t want no smoke
  76. Many an L taken
  77. Cool with those who are cool with me
  78. If I have my headphones in that means don’t ask me
  79. Amon is giving out fives
  80. That was brought to you by the letter…
  81. Most important lesson thus far is to be about your word. BlusterOne
  82. Honesty
  83. Deathstyles vs. Lifestyles
  84. Forward
  85. Fuse Green Episode: Gun Pockets: The Triumphs and Challenges of Fuse Green
  86. Tony Peralta Episode: M. Tony Peralta shares Insight from his Growth as an Artist and Entrepreneur
  87. Leo
  88. Vault of Culture
  89. Arturo Vega shares his Journey to the Ramones and Beyond Episode
  90. TMNK – Art is my Weapon Episode
  91. Lower East Side

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This episode is sponsored by Gorilla Coffee.

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Arts & Culture

Kenny Vera talks Ecuador, LOOT Lifestyle and Poco a Poco

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Kenny Vera

 

Kenny Vera talks running a small business, launching his LOOT Lifestyle brand, learning new languages and overcoming mistakes.

Keep Up With LOOT

  1. LOOT
  2. Instagram
  3. Twitter

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Show Notes

Being typed as we speak…
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This episode is sponsored by Gorilla Coffee.

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Arts & Culture

Contact High: 40 Years of Hip-Hop Photography with Vikki Tobak

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Vikkie Tobak

 
 

We’re back in Brooklyn, DUMBO to be exact and this time we are kicking it with Vikki Tobak. Vikki is a journalist, producer and the author of Contact High: A Visual History of Hip-Hop. In this episode we talk about growing up in Detroit, her photography moment, working with Gang Starr, working at Paper Magazine, interviewing Diddy when he was on the come up and her journey to Contact High.

About Vikki

  1. Purchase Contact High: A Visual
    History of Hip-Hop
  2. Twitter
  3. Instagram

VIKKI TOBAK is a journalist whose writing has appeared in The Fader, Complex, Mass Appeal, Paper, i-D, the Detroit News, Vibe, and many others. She is a former producer and columnist for CBS MarketWatch, CNN, Bloomberg News, TechTV, and other leading media organizations. Vikki is also the founding curator of FotoDC’s film program and served as the art commissioner/curator for the Palo Alto Public Art Commission in Silicon Valley. She has lectured about music photography at American University, VOLTA New York, Photoville, the Library of Congress, and the Museum of Contemporary Art Detroit.

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Contact High

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Show Notes

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View this post on Instagram

 

A post shared by Vikki Tobak (@vikki_tobak) on

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Photography by Janette Beckman

Salt-N-Pepa // Photography by Janette Beckman

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Show Notes Continued…

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Vikki Tobak

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We would love to hear your thoughts on the episode. Leave a comment on the Apple Podcast app and don’t forget to rate the show.

This episode is sponsored by Gorilla Coffee.

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Arts & Culture

Shirt King Phade – A Pioneer in Streetwear and Hip Hop Fashion

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Shirt King Phade

 

What’s up good people welcome to the New York Said podcast.

Today’s episode is very, very special to me. Today’s guest on the show is Phade of the Mighty Shirt Kings.

If you’ve a been a long time listener of the show then you’ve heard me speak about Phade and the Mighty Shirt Kings about a dozen or so times in previous episodes.

Shirt King Phade

Before I even knew I was a creative or before I was into art like that, I was into the the work of Phade. I remember really taking to the Shirt Kings when I was in High School. I wasn’t a collector because I really didn’t have it like that but whenever I saw their work, I stopped and really took it in.

Other than seeing Phade’s work on celebrities like Audio Two, Biz Markie and Bell Biv DeVoe, they used to have a booth down in the Jamaica Colosseum Mall. The Jamaica Colosseum Mall was the name of the building but me or anybody I knew never called it that. We just called it The Colosseum for short. To me, it was the heart of the Ave. It’s still there but to be honest, it ain’t what it used to be. The vibe, the mystique and the tension of that place is long gone.

Shirt King Phade

The energy I remember about The Colosseum is that it could go down at any moment. I’ve seen quite a few fights in there, I was there for the small Rodney King riot and heard all of the tales about what could happen to you if you went to the bathrooms or the parking lot rooftop.

What really set the tone for your visit to The Colosseum was the two or three security guards that stood inside once you got past the super heavy brass and glass doors. If you had a hat or a hood on they would yell at you with the utmost authority to take it off. They sounded like that corrections officer on Biggie’s first album that yelled “C74, Smalls!” But they would look directly at you and yell, “Hats off!” or “Yo take that hood off !” After while you just knew to do it. The security at The Colosseum was notorious but that’s different story all together.

Yeah, it was kinda nuts in there for a few years, I’m talking 1992-1999. I don’t remember anything after that because I was out of town.

In it’s heyday, The Colosseum was the best place to get sneakers (honestly it still is), it used to be the place to get the best mixtapes (honestly there is still a mixtape spot, I hit it up every time I’m in town), and of course if you had it like that, you’d go to the Mighty Shirt Kings booth to get a customized airbrushed t-shirt, denim jacket/jeans or one of them all black snapback hats with your name or crew on it. Those black hats were clean with just white airbrushed paint and usually accented with rhinestones.

Shirt King Phade

I couldn’t afford all that. I was a super broke kid from the hood but what I could afford was a picture in front of a Shirt Kings airbrushed backdrop. If I’m not mistaken they charged like five bucks for a Polaroid picture.

Redman - Shirt King Phade

These backdrops were the precursor to all of the street art murals you’re now seeing around the world. I’m not saying there weren’t street art murals back then but SEEN or Keith Haring wasn’t coming to South Jamaica Queens to paint big walls and they weren’t doing characters the way Phade was doing characters. The backdrops were pretty big. They were alway super colorful, full of characters from the cartoons I loved like Bugs Bunny and Bart Simpson but the characters where decked out in truck jewelry that resembled something I’d see on a Rakim or Slick Rick album cover. This resonated with me deeply.

I always wanted Shirt Kings denim jacket but I never got one. I’ve never told anyone this but I remember asking a creative kid from my block to make me a denim jacket like the Shirt Kings. He said he’d do it for $25 and I was like, “Bet!” Well, he made it and it took months but when I finally got it, it sucked. It didn’t have that “je ne sais quoi” that came with the hand painted work of the Shirt Kings. Plus he did the jacket in acrylic paint and not airbrush so the back of the jacket was heavy like an actual painted canvas. It was quite disappointing to say the least. I’m sure that kid is somewhere killing it right now, I wish I could remember his name.

Shirt King Phade

If I really think about it, my love for street art and art in general probably came from visiting the Shirt Kings down in the Colosseum. They may or may not have known it but it was like an art gallery down there. You know what, forget that, it was an art gallery. It was the first and only art gallery at the The Colosseum to my knowledge. The Shirt Kings gallery just so happened to be blasting the latest hip-hop, with a few arcade games and had a wall of pictures of all the MCs and actors who had stopped by in the past.

So yeah, to tell you that I was happy to kick it with Phade for a few hours in an understatement. It was like talking to a big brother from the block or an OG that didn’t mind pulling my coat to the key to longevity.

In this episode we talk about how Phade got his name, not selling out, his hundred year plan, Larry Love, the impact of Jam Master Jay and legacy.

This conversation was recorded in the Marcus Garvey Park out in Harlem.

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Show Notes

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We would love to hear your thoughts on the episode. Leave a comment on the Apple Podcast app and don’t forget to rate the show.

This episode is sponsored by Timothy Roquemore.

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