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Sean Corcoran, Curator at the Museum of the City of New York talks Collecting New York’s Stories

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Museum of the City of New York

Collecting New York’s Stories: Stuyvesant to Sid Vicious exhibition opens today at the Museum of the City of New York. Yesterday, Sean Corcoran, MCNY Curator of Prints & Photographs took a moment to highlight the gallery of historic and contemporary photographs showcased with New York Said’s Amon Focus. The audio interview can be heard below:

 

 

Featured here are a few of the photographs from the Collecting New York’s Stories: Stuyvesant to Sid Vicious exhibition which opens January 22, 2020 at the Museum of the City of New York.

Richard Sandler, CC Train, 1985

© Richard Sandler, CC Train, New York, 1985

© Richard Sandler, CC Train, New York, 1985

Richard Sandler is a street photographer and documentary filmmaker. He has directed and shot eight non-fiction films, including “The Gods of Times Square,” “Brave New York” and “Radioactive City.”

Jeffrey Henson Scales, Buy Black, 1986–1992

© Jeffrey Henson Scales, Buy Black, 1986–1992 (From series: “House’s Barbershop, Harlem”)

© Jeffrey Henson Scales, Buy Black, 1986–1992 (From series: “House’s Barbershop, Harlem”)

Jeffrey Henson Scales is a photographer, illustrator, editor, and is a photography editor at The New York Times. Currently there he is the photography editor of the Sunday Review, and the Food sections.He is also co-editor of the annual, Year In Pictures section for both print and online editions, as well as an illustrator for the newspaper. He curates The New York Times, photography column, “Exposures.” His most recent book, “House,” documents life in a legendary Harlem barbershop over the course of six years, and his most recent project, “Soho’s New Geeks” appeared in The New York Times Sunday Style section in 2017.

Janette Beckman, RUN DMC & Posse, 1984

© Janette Beckman, RUN DMC & Posse, Hollis, Queens, 1984

© Janette Beckman, RUN DMC & Posse, Hollis, Queens, 1984

Janette Beckman is a British documentary photographer who currently lives in New York City.[1] Beckman describes herself as a documentary photographer.[2] While she produces a lot of work on location (such as the cover of The Police album Zenyatta Mondatta, taken in the middle of a forest in the Netherlands), she is also a studio portrait photographer. Her work has appeared on records for the major labels, and in magazines including Esquire, Rolling Stone, Glamour, Italian Vogue, The Times, Newsweek, Jalouse,[3] Mojo and others.

Erik Falkensteen, Two Men and a Shadow, 1965

© Erik Falkensteen, Two Men and a Shadow, Lower Manhattan near the Hudson River

© Erik Falkensteen, Two Men and a Shadow, Lower Manhattan near the Hudson River

Born in Denmark, Erik Falkensteen came to NYC in the 1960’s it was still really NYC. He began a photo odyssey, which took him from the streets 1960’s-70’s Manhattan, to a very recent post-Jim Crow south, to Eastern Europe and Africa. Erik shot everything from everyday New Yorkers, to African presidents (Jomo Kenyatta, Julius Nyerere), folk singers (Pete Seeger) the Berlin Wall, and strange little boys named Kimathi.

Martha Cooper, Boy Jumping from Fire Escape, 1978

© Martha Cooper, Boy Jumping from Fire Escape, Lower East Side, 1978

© Martha Cooper, Boy Jumping from Fire Escape, Lower East Side, 1978

From 1977 until 1980, Martha Cooper worked as a staff photographer for the New York Post. Between daily assignments, Cooper began to document unsupervised children playing amidst the rubble and disintegrating neighborhoods of New York (primarily the Lower East Side). The photographs focus on the activities of children playing and being creative on New York City streets, and largely depict groups of children building toys or playing with found objects in the days before video games and computers. In today’s day and age when unsupervised play in city streets is a rarity, these photographs reflect a time that was not so long ago, but a radically different approach to social norms and child rearing. The Museum of the City of New York recently acquired a selection of twenty photographs from this series for its permanent collection.

Walter Rosenblum, Boy on Roof, 1938

© Walter Rosenblum, Boy on Roof, Pitt Street, New York, 38

© Walter Rosenblum, Boy on Roof, Pitt Street, New York, 1938

Walter Rosenblum has spent over sixty years making photographs that celebrate the intimacies of family, the innocence and optimism of youth, and the dignity of poor people. Early in his career, he was influenced by the work of Paul Strand and Lewis Hine, both of whom were mentors of the Photo League in New York. At the age of nineteen, Rosenblum began a longtime association with this organization, which was dedicated to socially concerned documentary photography. He remained active in the Photo League, as chair of the exhibition committee, as a league officer, and as the editor of its journal, Photo Notes, until the league disbanded in 1952.

Joe Conzo, JDL of the Cold Crush Brothers, 1981

© Joe Conzo, JDL of the Cold Crush Brothers at the Skate Key Roller Rink, The Bronx, 1981

© Joe Conzo, JDL of the Cold Crush Brother at the Skate Key Roller Rink, The Bronx, 1981

Born and raised in the Bronx, Joe Conzo acquired a flair for photography at the age of 9 while attending the Agnes Russell School on the campus of Columbia University; later, advancing those skills at the School of Visual Arts in New York. He grew up at the heels of his grandmother – a dynamic leader and passionate activist within the minority community of the South Bronx – the late Dr. Evelina Antonetty. His father, Joe Conzo Sr., was a long-time confidant and historian for the late “King of Latin Music” Tito Puente. Exposure to these “politically and culturally charged” worlds had a profound effect on how he viewed his environment through the lens of a camera.

Bruce Davidson, Subway, 1980

© Bruce Davidson, Subway, New York City, 1980

© Bruce Davidson, Subway, New York City, 1980

In 1980 Bruce Davidson began photographing the New York subway system, venturing regularly into this intoxicating, sometimes dangerous subterranean world. At first Davidson photographed in black and white, but he soon realized color was necessary to depict the intensity of this graffiti-covered landscape. Originally published in 1986, this updated Steidl edition of Subway is printed from new scans of Davidson’s Kodachrome slides and features additional images.

“I wanted to transform the subway from its dark, degrading, and impersonal reality into images that open up our experience again to the color, sensuality, and vitality of the individual souls that ride it each day” – Bruce Davidson

More on the Exhibition

Collecting New York’s Stories: Stuyvesant to Sid Vicious features highlights drawn from the hundreds of additions to the Museum’s permanent collection over the past three years, running the gamut from the colonial era to the recent past. A gallery of historic and contemporary photographs, currently open, showcases works by both well-known and emerging artists, including Janette Beckman, Bruce Davidson, Helen Levitt, Ruddy Roye, Richard Sandler, Gail Thacker, James Van Der Zee, Harvey Wang, and many others. A companion gallery, opening January 22, 2020, presents original drawings by long-time New Yorker illustrator Saul Steinberg alongside gifts of garments, posters, decorative arts objects, and many other artifacts speaking to the everyday life of the city. Together, these beautiful, eclectic, and poignant images and objects illuminate the compelling and layered identity of New York and its stories.

Museum of the City of New York
1220 Fifth Ave at 103rd St., Open Daily 10am–6pm

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Keepers of the Culture

Reflecting and Unpacking Memories with Helixx C. Armageddon

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Helixx C. Armageddon
Photography by Bob Krasner

 

 

Helixx C. Armageddon is a Performance Artist, Lyricist, Experimental Music Producer, Mother, NYC resident, 1/5 of the Anomolies and a Philosopher.

Visit: The House of Helixx

Special thanks to Gene Frankel Theatre: Intimate, storied rental space for performances & rehearsals, established in 1949.

Show Notes

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Keepers of the Culture

On the Phone with Pulitzer Prize-Winning Art Critic Jerry Saltz

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Portrait of Jerry Saltz by Celeste Sloman.
Portrait of Jerry Saltz by Celeste Sloman

 

 

The long awaited book “How To Be An Artist” by Jerry Saltz is here. Based off of his early Vulture essay by the same name, he wrote the work as a note to his younger self.

In this week’s episode Jerry Saltz, Senior Art Critic for New York Magazine talks with Amon Focus about being radically vulnerable, the importance of deadlines, the Pulitzer Prize and how to look at art. There are a few surprises in this interview but we don’t want to give it all away in the intro.

Just a heads up, during this conversation you may hear a little bit of phone static from time to time, it’s only for a few seconds, it’s nothing crazy, I just wanted to give you a heads up so you’re not wondering what the heck is that sound.

Listen & Enjoy!

 

Keep up to Date with Jerry Saltz

@JerrySaltz – Twitter

@JerrySaltz – Instagram

How to Be An Artist by Jerry Saltz

Want to Buy “How to Be An Artist” by Jerry Saltz?

 

New York 's art critic Jerry Saltz and his forthcoming book, How To Be An Artist (Riverhead Books, 2020).

New York ‘s art critic Jerry Saltz and his forthcoming book, How To Be An Artist (Riverhead Books, 2020).

 

“How to be an Artist” is a note to my younger self.

 

Show Notes

 

Importance of Deadlines

  1. I know they are bad
  2. Make a deadline
  3. Never break a deadline

 

Biggest Lessons thus Far:

  1. Be nice
  2. Energy-Bring it!
  3. Make an enemy of envy
  4. Don’t let rejection define you
  5. You have to listen to get the final lesson…(We can’t tell you everything)

 

New York Magazine art critic Jerry Saltz as Salvador Dalí, based on a photograph by Philippe Halsman. Photo-Illustration: Joe Darrow for New York Magazine.

New York Magazine art critic Jerry Saltz as Salvador Dalí, based on a photograph by Philippe Halsman. Photo-Illustration: Joe Darrow for New York Magazine.

 

Jerry Saltz Quotables

 

“…fear is the admission price to the house of creativity, to the house of art.”

“I have no choice but to get on with it.”

“Things only happen when you work.”

“Roberta is the greatest art critic alive.”

“I throw out about 99% of what I do”

“I’ve got to get back to the art world, I’m in agony.”

“I had to go through hell in the trucks to come out somehow perfect, pure, and ready for the stars.”

“I want people to know the me I think I am”

“We are mildly insane.”

“Art – the greatest abstract operating system(s) ever devised by our species.”

“Not all communication is accessible to all people”

“All art is subjective”

“No right way, no wrong way to look at art.”

“Don’t be intimidated by art”

“Deadlines come from Hell via Heaven.”

“You can learn enough from bad art as good.”

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Keepers of the Culture

Celebrating the Legacy of Ralph McDaniels and Video Music Box

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Uncle VJ Ralph McDaniels

In this episode we Celebrate the Legacy of Ralph McDaniels and Video Music Box. With over 35 years in the industry, Ralph sits down and shares his story with us.

Show Notes

  1. South Jamaica, Queens
  2. A South Side Kid
  3. Queens Jazz Musicians 
  4. Crack Era
  5. Chemical Warfare 
  6. War on Drugs
  7. Stop and Frisk
  8. Queens Central Library 
  9. A Cipher in Queens
  10. Sherwin Banfield
  11. Club Encore Mix
  12. Eddie Murphy 
  13. Disco Records
  14. Soul Music 
  15. Blue Ice Night Club
  16. Video Music Box
  17. Baisley Park
  18. 1990 Redman and Biz Markie Springfield Freestyle 
  19. Stretch and Bobbito
  20. Grandmast Vic
  21. Doggtime
  22. DJ Dirty Harry
  23. Lionel ‘Vid Kid’ Martin
  24. Mister Cheeks
  25. Mobb Deep
  26. WuTang – Ice cream 
  27. Shirt King Phade
  28. Jay Z
  29. Kool Red Alert 
  30. Dapper Dan
  31. LL Cool J
  32. Colosseum Mall
  33. FUBU
  34. Daymond John
  35. Karl Kani
  36. Cross Colours
  37. April Walker
  38. Diddy
  39. Hype Williams 
  40. Irv Gotti 
  41. Queens Village
  42. Mic Geronimo – Shit’s Real (It’s Real)
  43. Cash Money Click 
  44. Ja Rule 
  45. Self Destruction 
  46. KRS One Stop the Violence   
  47. Nassau Coliseum
  48. Nelson George
  49. D-Nice
  50. Overcoming Self Destruction – Docuementary
  51. MC Lyte
  52. Big Daddy Kane 
  53. Daddy-O
  54. Drake
  55. Chance the Rapper
  56. Uncle Murder
  57. Just-Ice 
  58. Wu-Tang Clan – C.R.E.A.M.
  59. Heavy D
  60. Salt-N-Pepa – Get Up Everybody
  61. Lil Wayne 
  62. “Don’t Get in the Way of you Getting the Interview”
  63. Ice-T
  64. Flip Da Script 
  65. Superstar Jay
  66. Funkmaster Flex
  67. Sway in the Morning
  68. Ebro Hot97
  69. DJ Clark Kent
  70. Chris Brown
  71. Cardi B
  72. ICP
  73. Vikki Tobak 
  74. Contact High
  75. Danny Hastings 
  76. It Ain’t Hard to Tell
  77. Nas EPK

 

 

  1. Q-Tip
  2. Belly
  3. Biggie
  4. Tribe Called Quest
  5. Leather Medallion 90s 
  6. Paid in Full
  7. Willie Burger
  8. Cappadonna 
  9. RZA
  10. Adobe After Effects
  11. Chyron 
  12. Grassvalley Wipe
  13. Tats Cru 106 and Park Ave
  14. Socrates Park 
  15. Fred “Bugsy” Buggs
  16. Imhotep Gary Byrd
  17. Hank Spann
  18. Disco fever
  19. Russel Simmons
  20. Davy DMX – One For The Treble (Originals B-Boy Dedication Video)
  21. Fat Boys
  22. Krush Groove
  23. Sheila E.
  24. Naughty by Nature 
  25. Juice (Film)
  26. Beat Street
  27. Breakin’ (Film) 
  28. 2Pac
  29. Ernest R. Dickerson
  30. Spike Lee
  31. Queen Latifah
  32. The Bomb Squad (Producers)
  33. Something for the Radio – Biz Markie
  34. Motown Philly
  35. Who Got the Props – Black Moon
  36. Tha Alkaholiks – Only When I’m Drunk 
  37. Loud Records 
  38. Gin and Juice 
  39. Yo MTV Raps
  40. Luke Ft. 2 Live Crew – I Wanna Rock
  41. New York Hot Track (Video Show)
  42. Who Is Gil Scott-Heron?
  43. Winter in America 
  44. S.O.B.’s
  45. Blue Note
  46. Crazy Sam

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We would love to hear your thoughts on the episode. Leave a comment on the Apple Podcast App and don’t forget to rate the show.

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